”Zen Master” Steven Seagal Eyes Up a Replacement for Bitcoin

Steven Seagal Eyes Up a Replacement for Bitcoin

Steven Seagal is eyeing up a cryptocurrency to replace bitcoin. Bitcoiin – count those I’s – may look and sound similar to bitcoin, but is very different. It runs on the Ethereum network, confusingly, and boasts “zen master” Steven Seagal as its brand ambassador. To add to the confusion, Bitcoiin with two I’s sports a website that’s one letter away from this one and styled in the same colors. The whole affair could be dismissed as another crypto joke, were it not for a tweet from Seagal’s official account throwing his considerable weight behind the project.

Also read: The ICO Scam Train Arrives in Sweden – Meet “Starflow”

Dotting the I’s and Crossing the T’s

Steven Seagal Eyes Up a Replacement for BitcoinBitcoin has survived all kinds of foes, but in Steven Seagal it may have met its biggest threat yet. The man who spent his professional life beating up bad guys has one final boss in his sights: bitcoin. If Seagal has his way, the world’s most popular cryptocurrency will be dealt a lethal one-two combo courtesy of bitcoiin2gen (B2G).

Pronounced, presumably, in the same manner was one would pronounce bitconeeeeeeect, bitcoiin is being billed as the ultimate sequel that will be “bigger and better” than the original. Naturally there’s an ICO, a white paper, and a roadmap which speaks of $50 million of venture capital being raised in September of last year. Apparently $50 million isn’t enough to launch a cryptocurrency these days. With “unlimited potential clients” and a “worldwide network approach”, Bitcoiin is quite the groundbreaking project.

Zen Master Zteven’s version of Bitcoin.

A Token Project with a Token Ambassador

News.bitcoin.com will refrain from linking to the site to prevent link confusion, though the curious are welcome to explore Bitcoiin dot com for themselves. With a four-tier ICO referral scheme, Bitcoiin is a literal pyramid. As for what happens after the ICO, hypothetically at least, the main event is December 2018, when B2G is projected to be trading at the curiously precise price of $388 a token – and ‘token’ is the key word here, for this is an ERC20 project.

Steven Seagal Eyes Up a Replacement for BitcoinAnyone trying to wrap their head around Bitcoiin may wish to scrutinize the official press release. Scam, spoof, or ‘legitimate’ project, it makes little difference: all that matters is Steven Seagal is fronting an ICO named Bitcoiin. It seems strangely fitting that the star of Exit Wounds and Above the Law should wind up promoting a dubious cryptocurrency. The twilight of the 65-year-old’s career has been dogged with sexual misconduct allegations. Bitcoiin could be the final nail in the coffin for the Marked for Death actor.

What do you make of Bitcoiin and Steven Seagal’s involvement in crypto? Let us know in the comments section below.


Images courtesy of Shutterstock, and Linkedin.


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The post ”Zen Master” Steven Seagal Eyes Up a Replacement for Bitcoin appeared first on Bitcoin News.

Bad Code Has Lost $500 Million of Cryptocurrency in Under a Year

Bad Code Has Lost $500 Million of Cryptocurrency in Under a Year

Cryptocurrency can be lost in a variety of ways, from hacking to forgotten passwords and failed flash drives. But in dollar terms, one of the biggest causes of crypto losses is bad code, and it’s not usually the fault of the coin’s developers. Instead, third parties, including shoddy smart contract developers and shady exchanges, are to blame for losses that have reached half a billion dollars in the last seven months.

Also read: Cryptocurrency Exchange Bitgrail Suspends Operations After ‘Losing’ $170 Million of Nano

Bitgrail Gets Railed for Dodgy Code

Last week, news.Bitcoin.com reported on the demise of Bitgrail, which contrived to lose $170 million of nano cryptocurrency. While the precise sequence of events that caused the catastrophic collapse of the exchange with the assets of thousands of customers is still being confirmed, poor code is being blamed. As reported at the time:

There are rumors that Bitgrail became insolvent following a withdrawal bug that was discovered by some users and then shared in Discord and other chat groups, causing the wallet balance to gradually diminish. One user explained: “There was a bug on Bitgrail where if you placed two orders you got double balance added to your account. You could then withdraw while the orders were up and steal the coins. You had negative balance in the end but you could just make a new account.”

Bad Code Has Lost $500 Million of Cryptocurrency in Under a Year

In the aftermath of the incident, this theory has been bolstered by allegations that a bug was indeed responsible, and not in nano’s code, but in Bitgrail’s. One source asserted: “There was a bug, on the withdraw page. But this check was only on java-script client side, you find the js which is sending the request, then you inspect element – console, and run the java-script manually, to send a request for withdrawal of a higher amount than in your balance. Bitgrail delivered this withdrawal. How many people did this? Who knows.”

There was another bug, you could request a withdrawal to your address – from another user-id, from another user-account. That would cause the other users balance to have “missing funds” or “negative balance”. Bitgrail bomber solved this bug by manually entering the “correct” numbers in his database. This is what you get for using a PHP website coded by same skill-level as CfB of IDIOTA.

Even the Best Cryptocurrencies Aren’t Immune to Poor Code

The cryptocurrency most commonly associated with catastrophic bugs is ethereum. That’s not due to its underlying code, but on account of the smart contracts that can be built on top of the ethereum framework. First there was the DAO, which led to ethereum being forked right out the gate, and then there was the Parity bug that caused 150,000 ETH to be stolen, followed by the other Parity bug that caused $168 million of ETH to be locked up.

In the past couple of weeks, ethereum bugs have surfaced once more, albeit on a smaller scale. Proof of Weak Hands (PoWH) was a joke scamcoin which turned into an actual scamcoin after a bug led to the loss of 900 ether worth $1 million that had been sent to the contract address. The developer then disappeared after receiving death threats from investors aggrieved to discover that the joke Ponzi they were buying into was even less legitimate than it had seemed.

Bad Code Has Lost $500 Million of Cryptocurrency in Under a Year
After a smart contract bug led to the loss of 900 ETH, the PoWH website looked like this in the days afterwards

PoWH has since spawned a new scamcoin called ethpyramid which is for “strong hands only”. To the question “Is Ethpyramid secure?” the site responds “Yes. Our dev team put a lot of time into refining and testing this contract to make sure your tokens are safe. Internal functions of the contract are not accessible to the end user.” There’s also PoWH420, “the world’s dank autonomous and self-sustaining 420 pyramid scheme”.

Bad Code Has Lost $500 Million of Cryptocurrency in Under a Year
PoWH 420

Even if joke coins and their joke developers are taken out of the equation, it’s evident that cryptocurrencies are only as strong as their weakest link. While altcoins such as ethereum and nano have undoubted potential, like every other crypto they’re hostage to bugs lurking in wallets, smart contracts, and exchanges. One bad line of code is all it takes.

Do you think Bitgrail was brought down by a withdrawal bug or is there more to this story? Let us know in the comments section below.


Images courtesy of Shutterstock, and PoWH420. Katie Webster assisted with this article. 


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The post Bad Code Has Lost $500 Million of Cryptocurrency in Under a Year appeared first on Bitcoin News.